Have a Lethargic Puppy? Find Real Illness Behind

lethargic-puppy

A lethargic puppy can be very worrisome for a (new) puppy owner, since we all know how wound up puppies usually are. If your puppy is lethargic then you might want to know about what causes this to happen because sometimes it can be life-threatening.

Related: Discover 13 Reasons Why Do Dogs Get Headaches

You also should know when to see a vet immediately. Lethargy in a puppy is often times a side effect or symptom of an underlying condition or problem.

Lethargy is defined as a lack of energy or exhaustion.

Symptoms of a lethargic puppy

There are many symptoms that you might notice if you have a lethargic puppy on your hands. Symptoms include your puppy appearing confused or disoriented. Lethargy often times manifests in your puppy sleeping a lot more and not having energy.

Vomiting and or diarrhea are also common symptoms. You also might notice panting, tremors, a high fever or signs of pain in your puppy as well. Your puppy might not be interested in treats or interested in greeting you when you arrive home for the day.

Your pup also might end up not eating normally. This could be not eating usual amounts or simply not eating at all. If your puppy is housetrained then you might notice that accidents are happening in the house more often as well.

If you notice the symptoms in your pup going on for more than 24 hours, this might be a good time to call the vet. If you notice blood in vomit or diarrhea then you should immediately call the vet.

This could be a sign of a more serious and life-threatening illness. This advice however is not a substitute for a proper consultation with a vet. The information should only be intended as a guide to help you find out if and why your puppy is lethargic.

Diseases and other issues that could cause lethargy

There are a lot of diseases and conditions that can cause lethargy, as well as other issues you might not think about. Here are some of the most common reasons why your puppy might be lethargic:

  • Heartworms – Heartworms can cause a lethargic puppy and can be the result of a mosquito bite. Preventing heartworms is the best way to prevent this from happening. Heartworms causes symptoms like lethargy and depression or fever.
  • Puppy Distemper – Distemper is a very serious virus that has no cure. It can be spread through direct or indirect contact with an infected pet or through air. It often attacks lymph nodes and tonsils. Within a week the gastrointestinal system, nervous sytem and respiratory system are all affected. Lethgargy is a  main symptom along with high fever and discharge from the nose and eyes. The only treatment is focused on mitigating the symptoms of the disease. However, this virus is preventable by vaccination, you should consult with your vet about timely protection.
  • Trauma or Injury – Your puppy could have become injured or have some trauma you did not know about. This includes falling from a bed or off a ledge outside. It could be simple trauma or something more severe internally that could be causing the lethargy. In some cases abuse you are unaware of could cause this too. An example of this would be a dogwalker mistreating your puppy when you are away.
  • Kennel Cough – A puppy with kennel cough will be lethargic and have a fever. Dry coughing is the biggest symptom of kennel cough. Cough suppressants and antibiotics are common ways to treat this condition. If it is severe enough intravenous antibiotics might have to be given.
  • Parvovirus – Your puppy could get parvovirus as a result of feces and it can include symptoms such as lethargy, abdominal pain and diarrhea.
  • Heart Disease – Heart disease and congestive heart failure could also cause your puppy to become lethargic. Loss of appetite and fast breathing also are symptoms after the disease progresses. Treatments can include heart medication, water pills and other lifestyle changes. The treatments often depends on how far the disease has progressed.
  • Liver Disease – A lethargic puppy could be the result of liver disease as lethargy and loss of appetite are big symptoms. Your puppy might also have bloating in the abdomen if liver disease is present. Often times treatment includes medication and possibly surgery if the disease has progressed.
  • Hypoglycemia – Your puppy might also have hypoglycemia which could be causing the lethargy. In plain terms this is low blood sugar, which is opposite of diabetes. It can lead to weakness and also could cause tremors or seizures. The treatment really depends on the cause, but  intravenous glucose might be given short-term.
  • Poisoning – Various poisonings could cause your puppy to be lethargic. This could be things like your puppy eating human food it should not be eating, such as onions or garlic. Adult or human medication could cause lethargy as well. Did you know most medications like ibuprofen are toxic to puppies? Poisoning could be any number of things as puppies love to pick up anything off the ground and eat it, and the biggest symptom of poisoning is lethargy.
  • Diabetes – Diabetes could be a reason why you have a lethargic puppy. Often times lethargy and increased thirst are the biggest symptoms. Your puppy might also be going through appetite changes and weight loss. Insulin and lifestyle changes such as dietary changes are typical treatments if diabetes is present.
  • Depression – Simple depression could be the cause and it would also show up with symptoms such as sleeping a lot and eating less. Depression can be caused by changes in the environment such as a new house, a new baby or pet, and other changes. Hormonal imbalances also could be to blame.
  • Various Pet Products or Medications – If your puppy is lethargic it could be due to pet products and various pet medications. Over-the-counter pet products are often more likely to cause reactions such as lethargy. Be aware if any changes you have made lately such as even a new puppy food or brand. It could simply be a reaction to a chemical within the product causing the lethargy.
  • Tumors – A puppy that is lethargic could also have a tumor you don’t know about, which is definitely scary. This is a reason why it is important to see a vet if the symptoms persist for more than 24 hours.
  • Snake Bites – We all know puppies do get into everything, so a snake bite could be why your puppy is lethargic as well. If you have a very curious puppy and live where snakes often roam, this could be a common but often overlooked cause.
  • Hormone Imbalances – Puppies could also end up having hormonal problems and imbalances, just like people. Hormonal imbalances in puppies often express with symptoms like lethargy, and simple diagnostic tests such as blood tests can determine whether a hormonal imbalance is the cause.

Treatments of puppy lethargy

Most of the treatment involves finding what caused the puppy lethargy in the first place, whether it is a disease or simply your puppy getting into something it should not. The treatments can vary also depending on the severity of the disease or condition responsible for causing the lethargy.

Although we talked about most common causes of lethargy, make sure you take your puppy to a vet within 24 hours so your puppy can be diagnosed correctly. This should only be a guide to help you narrow down what might be the cause of this condition. Our guide should not be considered medical advice and cannot replace the advice of a professional.

 

23 thoughts on “Have a Lethargic Puppy? Find Real Illness Behind”

  1. my vezlis is acting like he has bad depr he agood dog and getession. he had test for paro and parrsites and worms all came out negitive.he a good puppy and gets a lot of love.moxiejo

    • Thanks for connecting to Mysweetpuppy.net. Please keep in mind that I, Claudia Bensimoun, do not write any of the blogs or reviews on this website, nor have I in the past. I only answer the comments section.Good to hear that you visited your veterinarian for a health check. Puppies need to sleep a lot. That said, they also play alot as they get older. Intestinal parasites are most common in puppies, so it’s good to hear that your pup is free of them. Consult with your veterinarian as to the best puppy food for your puppy, and as to how much your puppy should be sleeping. You have not mentioned how old he is. Puppies need multiple feedings throughout the day with specially formulated puppy food. There are many good books about puppy care and puppy training. You should also start socializing your puppy from as early as 4 weeks of age, so that he gets used to being around other dogs, pets and people. As your puppy gets older (not sure how old he’s now), you can begin puppy training classes. This helps with basic training, and also allows for your puppy to have plenty of fun with other puppies. Hope this helps!

  2. my puppy is about 10 weeks old , all of a sudden out of the blue he became so sickly. he stopped eating, he’s lethargic doesnt want to play . I’ve given him dewormer but he’s been like this for 24 hours now

    • Thanks for connecting to Mysweetpuppy.net. Please keep in mind that I, Claudia Bensimoun, do not write any of the blogs or reviews on this website, nor have I in the past. I only answer the comments section.

      Please visit your veterinarian right away.Your vet will need to do a fecal examination, with additional treatments. Your puppy will also need to have a complete health check-up to make sure that he’s doing fine. Remember to bring along a fecal sample so that it can be tested.

  3. My puppy has no energy, no appetite just drinks water but throws it up had diahrrea once. He may have eaten something he shouldn’t have.kinda came out of it but no energy & just threw up firs time again today.

    • Thanks for connecting to Mysweetpuppy.net. Please keep in mind that I, Claudia Bensimoun, do not write any of the blogs or reviews on this website, nor have I in the past. I only answer the comments section.

      Signs of illness in pups may include the following:

      Change in behavior like lethargy
      Excessive thirst
      Lack of appetite
      Weight gain or weight loss
      Head shaking
      Bad breath
      Dandruff, loss of hair, hot spots, smelly skin and coat
      Discharges from ears or nose
      Difficulty walking
      Loss of balance
      Vomiting
      Whimpering
      Runny nose or runny eyes
      Coughing
      Diarrhea
      Squinting, and having problems seeing or focusing
      Seizures or twitching

      Your veterinarian will need to do lab tests for blood chemistry and blood cell counts. All sick pups need to be taken to the veterinarian immediately, most especially if they are having seizures or diarrhea.

      Here are some tips on how to make your pup feel more relaxed music therapy.
      For my article on how make your puppy smile, visit:http://www.usdaa.com/article.cfm?newsID=2868

    • Thanks for connecting to Mysweetpuppy.net. Please keep in mind that I, Claudia Bensimoun, do not write any of the blogs or reviews on this website, nor have I in the past. I only answer the comments section.

      Diarrhea is often indicative of a digestive disorder. Although there are numerous causes, here’s what to look out for.

      Diarrhea that is watery may be linked to hypersecretion. This happens when excess fluid is secreted into the intestines, and is usually caused by a bacterial infection. Diarrhea can also come form malabsorption where the nutrients are not being fully absorbed. This may be due to a virus like parvovirus,coronavirus,or rotavirus. Dehydration and electrolyte imbalance may lead to shock. If your dog has black, tarry stools, those are usually caused by internal bleeding in the stomach or small intestine. Puppies tend to get diarrhea if they are fed milk because they are unable to digest lactose.

      With any type of diarrhea or stomach problems, you’ll need to watch out for bloat or stomach distention in your dog. This is a life threatening condition that needs immediate veterinary care. If your dog has pain he will usually whine, pace and dry vomit. Your veterinarian will also include a visual inspection of the mouth and abdomen to see if there are any changes in size and shape.The veterinarian will feel your dog’s stomach to evaluate shape and size. A stethoscope will also be used to check for abnormal stomach sounds. It’s always a good idea to bring along a stool sample when visiting the veterinarian, so as to expedite a diagnosis.

      Vomiting, which usually follows nausea, drooling, or retching, can be short-term or long-term. If your puppy is tired,coughing,has weight loss and dehydration,you’ll need to visit your veterinarian asap. If your puppy is coughing and having breathing problems, this may be linked to regurgitation, instead of vomiting. Your veterinarian will try to identify the cause, and eliminate it. Your puppy will need time to rest and recover until his digestive system is up to par again.

      Treatment for Short-Term Vomiting

      .Withholding food for the period that your veterinarian recommends, and perhaps feeding a special diet.
      .Your dog may require intravenous fluids
      .When the vomiting ceases, gradual feeding may resume
      .Follow your veterinarian’s advice until your pooch is 100% better.

      Longterm Vomiting

      .If vomit contains blood, and is combined with lethargy, stomach cramps, dehydration, fever and weakness, your veterinarian will do blood and urine tests, as well as x-rays of the digestive system.
      .Your dog will also be given medication to cease the vomiting. Dehydration together with electrolyte imbalance, and possibly acid-based disorders will need to be treated. That said, it’s always best to consult with your veterinarian as soon as your puppy is under the weather. Stomach disorders are painful, and need to be treated right away.

      For more information about vomiting in dogs, visit:https://www.petmd.com/dog/emergency/common-emergencies/e_dg_vomiting

      For a veterinarian in your area, visit:https://www.veterinarians.com

      Thanks for connecting to Mysweetpuppy.net. Please keep in mind that I, Claudia Bensimoun, do not write any of the blogs or reviews on this website, nor have I in the past. I only answer the comments section.

  4. My puppy threw up several times lastnight, diahrrea once, no energy, appetite, only drinks water and just threw that up first time today. He may have eaten something he shouldn’t have cause he chews everything. What can i do, i have no money for a vet & i love my Den Den very much! Please help

    • Thanks for connecting to Mysweetpuppy.net. Please keep in mind that I, Claudia Bensimoun, do not write any of the blogs or reviews on this website, nor have I in the past. I only answer the comments section.
      If you are looking for low cost veterinary care,there are numerous agencies which you can look in to. It is very important that your puppy gets regular veterinary care.AVMF’s Veterinary Care Charitable Fund allocates funds to partner veterinary clinics. These clinics will provide free and discounted care. Ask your veterinarian if they have partnered with AVMF, so that you can get free veterinary help for your puppy. Pups require plenty of veterinary care and attention.

      Puppy vaccinations are a must. Your job as a puppy parent is to provide your puppy with preventative health care, and to continue taking him to the veterinarian for the rest of his life. Your pup needs to be vaccinated against infectious diseases, and will also need to be treated for worms and other intestinal parasites. If your pup is ill, consult with your veterinarian asap, and work out a payment plan. It is extremely important to establish a great health-care plan for your pup, and to give him the best life that he deserves!

      Pet insurance should be a priority for all pet parents. Having pet insurance helps puppy parents immensely with veterinary emergencies and vet bills. To find out more about pet insurance, visit:https://booksforever1blog.wordpress.com/2018/01/02/why-having-pet-insurance-for-your-dogs-is-important/

    • Thanks for connecting to Mysweetpuppy.net. Please keep in mind that I, Claudia Bensimoun, do not write any of the blogs or reviews on this website, nor have I in the past. I only answer the comments section.I am in no way connected to the content written within this website, most especially the German Shepherd blog. This website hires other writers for their blogs.Please do not contact me regarding website content. I only write content within the comments section.o Puppies Sleep A Lot?

      All young puppies sleep a lot.Pups may sleep as much as 18 to 20 hours a day,with the norm being 20 hours. They tend to be more active at night, but soon get used to your schedule. Pups are growing and need to sleep to be able to do so.There is brain development going on as your pup sleeps. Healthy pups and sleep go hand in hand. Sleep is essential so that the immune system, nervous system, brain and muscles can develop. Allow for your pup to have a comfortable dog bed or crate. That said, make sure that his sleep area is calm and free of distractions and noise.

      As for veterinary visits, your veterinarian will give your puppy vaccinations. Fecal examinations will also be necessary to check for parasites like worms. Your veterinarian will also give you advice as to how to properly care for your puppy.

      There are 6 canine life stages.

      .Puppy
      .Junior
      .Adult
      .Mature
      .Senior
      .Geriatric

      or more information, visit:https://www.aaha.org/pet_owner/aaha_guidelines/canine_life_stage.aspx

  5. My puppy was rescued from a village in remote Alaska. We moved about 10 days ago and he was fine until this morning. Vomiting and lethargy are the 2 biggest symptoms along with no appetite. With no care within 300 miles, what can I do?!? We are very scared for him.

    • Thank you for visiting mysweetpuppy.net. At mysweetpuppy.net we strive to give our readers the best puppy care information. Please keep in mind that I, Claudia Bensimoun, do not write any of the blogs or reviews on this website, nor have I in the past. I only answer the comments section.Please visit:https://virtualvets.com/questions/

      If you’re in a remote village, your best bet would be to contact a virtual veterinarian.

      Eye injuries in puppies and dogs will need a fast diagnosis. Diagnosis will need to be accurate to save the pup’s vision. Traumatic proptosis of the eye is bulging of the eye. This is the result of an injury to the eye. Penetrating injuries to the eye from objects happen often. That said, the veterinarian will need to examine your pup’s eye to see if there is lens injury or other damage to the eye. In our blog “Have a Lethargic Puppy,” the blog discusses puppy illnesses. All pups need vaccinations. They will receive some immunity from their mothers, but this wears off. You will need to visit a veterinarian to get your puppy vaccinated. Your puppy will also need to be treated for parasites.

      Distemper is an airborne viral disease affecting dogs. It also affects raccoons. Pups affected with distemper may have a fever, vomit, be prone to diarrhea, have a loss off appetite, dehydration, tremors,weakness,lethargy,as well as incoordination.That said, it is most important to contact a veterinarian as soon as possible. Routine veterinary care for puppies and dogs is an important part of being a pet parent. Your puppy will need regular ongoing veterinary care for vaccinations, dental care,and parasite control.

      “In a new study, researchers have shown that retinal cells in three distinct forms of canine early-onset blindness possess an unexpected feature: they temporarily rejuvenate. Further investigation into the reasons for this period of retinal neuron proliferation could lead to molecular targets for intervening in cell death and maintaining functional photoreceptor cells and a working retina.”

      For more information, visit: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/03/160318181701.htm

  6. In addition to my previous comment, we did notice and abnormality in his eye a couple of days ago with has corrected itself. It almost looked smashed in and off center. Like I said, that has corrected itself or so it seems…..

    • Thanks for connecting to Mysweetpuppy.net. Please keep in mind that I, Claudia Bensimoun, do not write any of the blogs or reviews on this website, nor have I in the past. I only answer the comments section.I am in no way connected to the content written within this website, most especially the German Shepherd blog. This website hires other writers for their blogs.Please do not contact me regarding website content. I only write content within the comments section.Vaccine additives, known as adjuvants are used to help speed up, enhance, or prolong the dog’s immune response to the vaccine.That said, there is sometimes an adverse reaction, although adjuvants have been used in vaccines for decades.

      For the latest news about dog vaccinations, The World Small Animal Veterinary Association ( WSAVA) discusses world vaccination guidelines compiled by the Vaccination Guideline Group.( VGG) Here’s the link: https://www.wsava.org/Guidelines/Vaccination-Guidelines

      Adverse reactions in your puppy from vaccine additives may include the following:

      .Reactions to thimerosal that may include a delayed hypersensitivity from 3-45 days after vaccinations.(usually 30 days after)
      .Skin inflammation with pain or swelling
      .Allergic responses
      .Incomplete inactivation
      .Disease in pups or dogs with a compromised immune system
      .Neurological complications
      .Mild to severe hypersensitivity with anaphylactic shock

      Although avoiding vaccine additives is impossible, puppy parents can lessen chances for an adverse reaction by consulting with their veterinarian and spacing out their vaccinations. Try to avoid over-vaccinating your puppies, by discussing your puppy vaccine schedule with your veterinarian beforehand. Keep in mind that you’ll need to monitor your puppy after vaccines for adverse reactions.

      Traveling internationally with your dog requires vaccines. Every destination country will have different requirements. The Center For Disease and Control (CDC) recommends researching the vaccine requirements ahead of time. For more on vaccine travel requirements, visit:https://www.cdc.gov/importation/traveling-with-pets.html

    • Thanks for connecting to Mysweetpuppy.net. Please keep in mind that I, Claudia Bensimoun, do not write any of the blogs or reviews on this website, nor have I in the past. I only answer the comments section.I am in no way connected to the content written within this website, most especially the German Shepherd blog. This website hires other writers for their blogs.Please do not contact me regarding website content. I only write content within the comments section.All puppies need to have vaccines. Consult with your veterinarian if your puppy is not feeling well. Your puppy will need to have core and noncore vaccines when he feels better. Core vaccines will include distemper, adenovirus, parvovirus,and rabies.Noncore vaccines include bordetella, leptospirosis, lyme disease, parainfluenza, giardia, and coronavirus. Booster vaccines are given yearly. That said, there has been a revision for yearly booster vaccinations. You will need to consult with your veterinarian to get the best advice as to which vaccines your dog should have.

      Puppies tend to sleep a lot, and need to sleep for growth. If your puppy has a lack of appetite, vomiting, diarrhea, coughing, runny nose, or discharge from the ears or eyes, consult with your veterinarian. Stiffness and seizures require immediate veterinary care. Spacing out vaccines is also becoming popular today. Pups will need to be vaccinated at 3-4 week intervals, starting at 8 weeks of age. This will end at 18 weeks of age, with the final vaccine being the most important. At one year of age, your pup will need to start with his booster vaccines. This is followed by booster vaccines every 3 years, instead of every year.

      Pets with out-of-date rabies vaccinations are very unlikely to develop the fatal disease if given a rabies booster immediately after exposure to the virus, according to a new study by Kansas State University.
      “Each year the U.S. has around 6,000 documented cases of rabies, mostly in raccoons, skunks, bats and foxes. The disease is usually fatal for animals. Pets with out-of-date vaccinations that are exposed to the rabies virus are required to either stay in observed quarantine for six months — which can cost owners $5,000-$7,000 — or to be euthanized.” via Science Daily. The study also mentions that “While conducting trials, researches also found that some manufacturers’ formulations for their one-year and three-year rabies vaccines were identical.”

    • Thanks for connecting with Mysweetpuppy.net. At Mysweetpuppy.net we strive to give our readers the most updated puppy product reviews and puppy care advice.

      You’re probably wondering how to ask your veterinarian if medical marijuana would help?

      “Dogs prescribed medical marijuana have definitely benefitted,” says Darlene Arden, a Certified Animal Behavior Consultant. “The results are almost immediate. Elderly dogs are running around like puppies, and their last months or years are far more comfortable. Those with cancer are no longer in any sort of pain. It increases the appetite. In other words it improves the quality of life. Not surprisingly, few veterinarians are prescribing medical marijuana yet, but I think we’ll see a trend that way once some testing is done.”via Animal Wellness.

      One of the drawbacks of medical marijuana for dogs is that it hasn’t been studied enough yet. Many veterinarians are in favor of further research on cannabis, but they urge caution until there’s more science behind its use.

      Dr. Duncan Lascelles, Professor of Surgery and Pain Management at the North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine has spent 22 years of his professional career researching how to better alleviate pain in animals. He firmly believes that medical marijuana has a lot of potential, but there needs to be more research done.

      “Just because it’s natural, does not mean it’s safe,” adds Dr. Lascelles. “There are many natural products that are toxic in certain quantities, or when presented as certain extracts or preparations, and we need to remember there are many, many different formulations and strengths of marijuana.” “However, dogs do have the same natural cannabinoid receptors in the endocannabinoid system as humans,” says Dr. Lascelles (The endocannabinoid system involves physiological processes such as appetite, pain sensation, mood and memory.) These receptors are found in the dog’s brain and peripheral nervous system. In fact, scientific research has confirmed that cannabis receptors exist in many different species, including dogs.

      “Dog parents should never administer medical marijuana,” he cautions. Darlene agrees: “Marijuana should be dispensed under medical care.” It may take some time, if ever, before medical marijuana becomes a mainstream pain reliever for dogs. More studies have to be done on its effects and dosing, and the legal complications must be overcome (see sidebar). But it’s showing a lot of promise. Darlene says, “I think the benefits far outweigh any negative connotations, if it’s used judiciously, people are educated about how to use and store it, and it is carefully dosed to the size of the dog.”

      That said, pet parents should always consider having pet health insurance in case of a veterinary emergency.

      For more on my article about medical marijuana for dogs, visit:https://animalwellnessmagazine.com/medical-marijuana-for-dogs/
      For the best canine cancer blog, visit:https://www.dogcancerblog.com/meet-the-veterinarians-dr-dressler/

      Thanks for connecting to Mysweetpuppy.net. Please keep in mind that I, Claudia Bensimoun, do not write any of the blogs or reviews on this website, nor have I in the past. I only answer the comments section.

    • Thanks for connecting with MySweetPuppy.net! At MySweetPuppy.net we strive to give our readers current and accurate puppy product reviews and puppy care tips!

      The Boston Terrier , also known as the Boston Bull, belongs to the UKC, Companion Group, and the AKC, Non-Sporting Group. This dog bred is small and compact. With a square skull, and a wide muzzle that is short, the Boston Terrier carries a wide black nose, and has wonderful large, round brown eyes. The ears are small, and the tail is short. The Boston Terrier has an easy-going temperament, and is both intelligent and determined. This dog breed gets along with other dogs, animals, and people. This dog breed has a moderate activity level, and is fine with country or city living. That said, the Boston Terrier may be prone to a few health concerns. These are as follows:

      .Brachycephalic syndrome
      .Deafness
      .Mange
      .Cataracts
      .Luxating Patellas
      .Hypothyroidism

      A 2015 study published in Plos One discusses the impact of facial confirmation on canine health, adds ” Brachycephaly–foreshortening of the facial skeleton–is a discrete mutation that has been selected for in many popular dog breeds e.g. the Bulldog, Pug, and French Bulldog. A chronic, debilitating respiratory syndrome, whereby soft tissue blocks the airways, predominantly affects dogs with this conformation, and thus is labelled Brachycephalic Obstructive Airway Syndrome (BOAS).” via Plos One ” The condition arises in brachycephalic animals because, despite a marked reduction in facial skeleton length , the soft tissue structures of the oral cavity (e.g. soft palate, tongue, tonsils) are not proportionally reduced. As an affected dog matures, the compacted soft tissue increasingly impede airflow by blocking the larynx and nasopharynx, and impairs the thermoregulatory function of the nose via internal [13] and external nasal obstruction [14]. Within the nose, turbinate growth in young brachycephalic dogs continues despite inhibition of growth of the mid-face, resulting in relatively oversized turbinates [15]. The resulting contact between turbinate lamella mucosal surfaces impedes nasal airflow. Externally, the wing of the nostril (ala nasi) is congenitally deformed in many brachycephalic dogs [14], with a narrowing of the nostrils (‘stenotic nares’). These primary abnormalities can result in markedly increased respiratory efforts to overcome airway resistance, fostering collapse of the airway”

      This study concludes ” Our results quantitatively demonstrate for the first time how breeding for flatter faces dramatically increases the risk of chronic airway obstruction in domestic dogs. The phenomenon of a desired conformation directly impacting on normal function is likely to extend to all domesticated species with malleable phenotypes.”

      Pet parents considering being dog parent to this wonderful dog breed need to take into account all the health conditions, prior to adopting or purchasing a Boston Terrier. That said, always consult with your veterinarian for the best advice!

      That said, having pet health insurance may be beneficial, most especially with dog breeds that may be genetically prone to certain health problems.

      For more on my article published in the United States Dog Agility Association (USDAA) about how dog behavior varies with skull size, weight, and height visit: https://www.usdaa.com/article.cfm?newsID=2787

      For more on my interview with Olympic Silver Medalist freestyle skier, Gus Kenworthy and dog rescue, visit:https://www.fidofriendly.com/article/from-russia-with-love

      Thanks for connecting to Mysweetpuppy.net. Please keep in mind that I, Claudia Bensimoun, do not write any of the blogs or reviews on this website, nor have I in the past. I only answer the comments section.

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